News

GNU releases ethical evaluations of code-hosting services

Free Software Foundation - lun, 25/04/2016 - 21:55

The completed evaluations can be viewed on the evaluation page, while the criteria page offers more information on the evaluation process, as well as the criteria themselves.

Repositories are used not only by software developers but also by software users, and they have a large impact on the free software community. The evaluations promote and honor good ethical practices on the part of repositories, and make it easy for users to find services that respect them.

Version 1.0 of the criteria ranks sites on a score from F (unacceptable) to A+ (extra credit). No site has yet received extra credit, but Savannah achieved an A grade. An F grade shows the service has not met even the minimum ethical standards expected for the hosting of a GNU package. GNU's Repo Criteria Discussion list is happy to offer assistance to repository-hosting organizations seeking to improve their service's score.

One service which has passed the criteria is GitLab. "We want to allow everyone to contribute to software. We recognize that many people have a need for free software to do this," said GitLab's CEO Sytse Sijbrandij, adding that "as a former developer myself, I think it is natural that you can contribute to the software you use to collaborate." Many repository sites require the user to run proprietary JavaScript to access their full functionality, but GitLab has addressed this by relicensing its JavaScript as free software.

Savannah, which has also passed these criteria, "host[s] projects for the sake of the ideals of freedom and community that the free software movement stands for," according to its Web site, which also makes clear that "[t]he space given to you on this server is given for the expressed purpose of advancing free software." Savannah is hosted by the FSF but run almost entirely by a dedicated team of volunteers.

Andrew Ferguson, a community member who played a leadership role in the evaluation project, said "More volunteers with coding ability are needed to aid the development of existing repository services to help them meet these criteria. All community members are encouraged to write the administrators of code-hosting services, to build awareness and a motivation to improve their ethical evaluations. GitHub has responded to some requests from the free software community and has recently updated its license chooser to include the GPLv3 license. However more community advocacy is required, as GitHub still fails to meet the criteria."

General discussion regarding the criteria or evaluations can be directed to the libreplanet-discuss mailing list. If you'd like to lend your help evaluating repositories, please join the repo-criteria-discuss list.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942 x31
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

NC393-CS

Elphel - jeu, 21/04/2016 - 23:22





NC393-CS is a network camera series 393 capable of streaming high resolution video.

Features:

  • Free Software and Open Hardware
  • User/developer friendly: HTML, JavaScript, PHP, Python, CGI, C/C++, Verilog
  • Operating System: OpenEmbedded Linux (Yocto build)
  • Hardware:
    • 5MPix or 14MPix, 1/2.5" format sensors
    • Xilinx Zynq 7030 SoC - Dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 + FPGA, 800MHz
    • RAM: 1GB (system) and 0.5 GB (fpga) DDR3 memory
    • 1 GB NAND Flash
    • 1 GigE
    • μSD
    • m.2 SSD
    • μUSB2
    • eSATA+USB2 - 2in1 port
    • 4x sensor ports - routed to FPGA, each reconfigurable for general multi-purpose use
    • External sync port
  • Power:
    • 18-75V or 12-36V
  • Without lens or adapters:
    • WxHxL: 40x45x123 mm
    • Weight: 215g
  • SDK
  • more info

Custom modifications (e.g., 12V) are available for all products.



Order:

Tags: 393
Catégories: News

FSF Job Opportunity: Operations Assistant

Free Software Foundation - jeu, 21/04/2016 - 17:25

This position works closely with FSF staff and management to ensure all administrative functions of the FSF run smoothly and efficiently, preserving our 4-star Charity Navigator rating and boosting all areas of our work.

The Operations Assistant is responsible for handling phone calls, managing office operations, and being a friendly face for visitors to our office at the center of Boston's Downtown Crossing. Examples of job responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

  • fulfilling orders for FSF merchandise and related bookkeeping,
  • blogging about merchandise-related news,
  • processing incoming donations,
  • coordinating volunteers,
  • updating our contact database,
  • organizing fundraising mailings, membership mailings, and similar communications,
  • assisting with local and special events, including our annual LibrePlanet conference,
  • assisting with website maintenance, and
  • looking after the office space.

This is a great opportunity for a team-oriented self-starter who thrives on multitasking, is calm under pressure, has an eye for detail, and wants to make a difference. The position must be worked from the Boston office, and the position must be able to lift small to medium-size packages (up to 50 pounds) on a regular basis. With our small staff of thirteen, each person makes a clear contribution. We work hard, but offer a humane and fun work environment.

Because our mission is worldwide, language skills and a demonstrated ability to interact with people across cultures and age groups will be highly valued. While the position does not require advanced computer skills, a willingness to learn and work with new software is a must. We use free software like CiviCRM, Plone, Emacs, and LibreOffice, all running on GNU/Linux.

The FSF is a growing organization and provides great potential for advancement; existing staff get the first chance at any new job openings. Previous Operations Assistants have often gone on to hold other positions within the organization.

Benefits and salary

This job is a union position. The salary is fixed at $51,646/year and is non-negotiable. Other benefits include the following:

  • full family health coverage through Blue Cross/Blue Shield's HMO Blue program,
  • subsidized dental plan,
  • four weeks of paid vacation annually,
  • seventeen paid holidays annually,
  • public transit commuting cost reimbursement,
  • 403(b) program through TIAA-CREF, and
  • yearly cost-of-living pay increases (based on government guidelines).

Resumes and cover letters must be submitted via email to hiring@fsf.org. The email must contain the subject line, "Operations Assistant". Resumes should be attached in text, PDF, or OpenDocument. No Word documents, please. Email submissions that do not follow these instructions will be ignored.

Applications must be received by Friday, May 20, 2016.

The FSF is an equal opportunity employer and will not discriminate against any employee or application for employment on the basis of race, color, marital status, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, handicap, or any other legally protected status recognized by federal, state or local law.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

Catégories: News

Interpreting, enforcing and changing the GNU GPL, as applied to combining Linux and ZFS

Free Software Foundation - lun, 11/04/2016 - 21:03

The FSF's statement explains why the current license of ZFS prevents it from being combined with Linux. To reach that conclusion, the statement covers all the necessary background for understanding license incompatibilities and violations in general.

In January of 2005, the FSF added to its license list an explanation that the Common Development and Distribution License, version 1.0 (CDDL), though a free license, is incompatible with all versions of the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL). While the CDDL is not commonly used, it is the license that Sun Microsystems (and now Oracle) chose for distributing the file system ZFS. ZFS was originally written for Solaris, but recent projects aim to make it work as a module with other operating system kernels, including Linux, which is licensed under the terms of the GNU GPL version 2.

"Normally, incompatibility questions like this are raised by people trying to write proprietary modules for copyleft free programs. They want to benefit from the work done by free software developers without providing others the same freedom, and they treat users unethically. That is not the case here, because ZFS is free software. The ideal solution would be for Oracle, who has become a large and tremendously influential distributor of GPL-covered code, to show their leadership by giving explicit permission allowing their ZFS work to be used under the GPL," said FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Joshua Gay.

FSF's executive director John Sullivan added, "The FSF does not develop Linux and does not presume to tell the developers of Linux when to do GPL enforcement. What we do is provide general materials that make clear the intent behind the GNU family of licenses, and the legal basis for that intent, to create shared and reliable best practices surrounding their use. As this statement makes clear, we support and encourage GPL enforcement work in this area and others when it is done in agreement with these best practices, and in accord with the Principles of Community-Oriented GPL Enforcement."

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About the GNU Operating System and Linux

Richard Stallman announced in September 1983 the plan to develop a free software Unix-like operating system called GNU. GNU is the only operating system developed specifically for the sake of users' freedom. See https://www.gnu.org/gnu/the-gnu-project.html.

In 1992, the essential components of GNU were complete, except for one, the kernel. When in 1992 the kernel Linux was re-released under the GNU GPL, making it free software, the combination of GNU and Linux formed a complete free operating system, which made it possible for the first time to run a PC without non-free software. This combination is the GNU/Linux system. For more explanation, see https://www.gnu.org/gnu/gnu-linux-faq.html.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Catégories: News

Anti-DRM activists go to W3C meeting to protest Digital Restrictions Management in Web standards

Free Software Foundation - mar, 22/03/2016 - 17:55

The protest began outside the W3C office and continued with a march past Google's Cambridge office, to Microsoft's office nearby. The companies are both supporters of Encrypted Media Extensions (EME), the proposal to enshrine DRM in Web standards. The protest included free software users and developers, including Richard Stallman and Chris Webber, the maintainer of the GNU MediaGoblin decentralized publishing platform. A small number of protesters split from the group, their actions were not condoned by the FSF, to enter the W3C meeting but they were ejected by police.

DRM in Web standards would make it cheaper and more politically acceptable to impose restrictions on users, opening the floodgates to a new wave of DRM throughout the Web, with all the vulnerabilities, surveillance and curtailed freedom that DRM entails.

In the week before the protest, Dutch activists held their own demonstration at the Amsterdam W3C office, and a Brazilian Web expert met with staff at the W3C office in São Paulo. Concerned people from around the world posted selfie photos with protest signs against DRM, many in front of other W3C offices. For every person at the protest, there were about five hundred who spoke up online against Encrypted Media Extensions.

"The fight against digital restrictions in Web standards is a new front in the struggle for liberty and expression on the global network. It matters for many of the same reasons as protecting strong encryption and net neutrality, or reigning in online surveillance: increasingly, the Web mediates our politics and our society. We cannot be free without a free Web" said by Zak Rogoff, FSF campaigns manager.

The W3C responded to the pressure with multiple posts on the topic in recent weeks, and participated in a public dialogue about the issue following the protest. The dialogue was hosted by the MIT Media Lab and included Richard Stallman of the Free Software Foundation, Joi Ito of the Media Lab and Danny O'Brien of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). At the public dialogue, W3C staff member Harry Halpin pledged to resign in protest if the standards body recommend Encrypted Media Extensions.

The FSF, EFF and others concerned with Internet and software freedom have been protesting Encrypted Media Extensions since 2013. The Free Software Foundation's opposition to Encrypted Media Extensions has included a petition to Stop the Hollyweb, signed by more than 33,000 people and delivered to the W3C with fanfare, a joint letter signed by 27 organizations, and a boycott against Netflix for its role in developing Encrypted Media Extensions. This work is coordinated through the Foundation's anti-DRM campaign, Defective by Design.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About Defective By Design

Defective by Design is the Free Software Foundation's campaign against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media, creating a good that is defective by design. DRM requires the use of proprietary software and is a major threat to computer user freedom. It often spies on users as well. The campaign, based at defectivebydesign.org, organizes anti-DRM activists for in-person and online actions, and challenges powerful media and technology interests promoting DRM. Supporters can donate to the campaign at https://www.defectivebydesign.org/donate.

Media Contacts

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

Library Freedom Project and Werner Koch are 2015 Free Software Awards winners

Free Software Foundation - dim, 20/03/2016 - 01:55

The Award for Projects of Social Benefit is presented to a project or team responsible for applying free software, or the ideas of the free software movement, in a project that intentionally and significantly benefits society in other aspects of life. This award stresses the use of free software in the service of humanity.

This year, it was given to the Library Freedom Project, a partnership among librarians, technologists, attorneys, and privacy advocates which aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries. By teaching librarians about surveillance threats, privacy rights and responsibilities, and digital tools to stop surveillance, the project hopes to create a privacy-centric paradigm shift in libraries and the local communities they serve. Notably, the project helps libraries launch Tor exit nodes. Project founders Alison Macrina and chief technology wizard Nima Fatemi accepted the award.

The Award for the Advancement of Free Software is given annually to an individual who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of free software.

This year, it was presented to Werner Koch, the founder and driving force behind GnuPG. GnuPG is the defacto tool for encrypted communication. Society needs more than ever to advance free encryption technology. Werner Koch was unable to attend, so the award was accepted on his behalf by David Shaw, a GnuPG contributor since 2002.


About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org


Photo of Werner Koch by Willi Nothers , licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License


Other photos by Kori Feener, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Catégories: News

AHCI platform driver

Elphel - lun, 14/03/2016 - 08:00
Catégories: News

LibrePlanet free software conference coming to MIT in one week, March 19-20

Free Software Foundation - ven, 11/03/2016 - 23:35

LibrePlanet 2016 will feature sessions for all ages and experience levels, and a promotional video for the event has just been released.

Organized around the theme "Fork the System", the conference's sessions will examine how free software creates the opportunity of a new path for its users, allows developers to fight the restrictions of a system dominated by proprietary software by creating free replacements, and is the foundation of a philosophy of freedom, sharing, and change. Keynote speakers include NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden in conversation with the ACLU's Daniel Kahn Gillmor; Open Source Initiative board president Allison Randal; Free Software Foundation founder Richard Stallman; and Software Freedom Conservancy executive director Karen Sandler.

This year's LibrePlanet conference will feature over 40 sessions, such as Yes, the FCC might ban your operating system, Trans Code: Free software as model & critique of diversity by transgender hackers, and Ending Online Tracking! Privacy Badger and Beyond!, as well as a hands-on workshop showing participants how to use the free software 3-D animation program Blender and a Libreboot install workshop.

"This year's LibrePlanet conference will be our biggest ever, and it's not hard to see why," said Georgia Young, program manager at the Free Software Foundation. "From the conversation with Edward Snowden, to strategy sessions aimed at helping activists use free software in their social change work, to talks encouraging free software advocacy in school and your workplace, the conference offers intriguing ways for anybody to Fork the System."

Due to high demand, advance registration is closed. Attendees may register in person at the event.

About LibrePlanet

LibrePlanet is the annual conference of the Free Software Foundation, and is co-produced by the Student Information Processing Board. What was once a small gathering of FSF members has grown into a larger event for anyone with an interest in the values of software freedom. LibrePlanet is always gratis for associate members of the FSF. To sign up for announcements about LibrePlanet 2016, visit https://www.libreplanet.org/2016.

LibrePlanet 2015 was held at MIT from March 21-22, 2015. Over 350 attendees from all over the world came together for conversations, demonstrations, and keynotes centered around the theme of "Free Software Everywhere." You can watch videos from past conferences at http://media.libreplanet.org.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contact

Georgia Young Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

ThinkPenguin VPN mini-router now FSF-certified to respect your freedom

Free Software Foundation - ven, 11/03/2016 - 01:06

This is the fourth product and second router from ThinkPenguin to achieve RYF certification. The TPE-R1100, just like the TPE-NWIFIROUTER Wireless-N router that was certified in Sept. 2014, runs LibreCMC, an FSF-endorsed GNU/Linux distribution. The TPE-R1100 can be purchased from ThinkPenguin at https://ThinkPenguin.com/TPE-R1100.

The Free Software Wireless-N Mini Router is not intended to replace one's existing wifi router or modem. Instead, it connects to your existing router and provides a simple and inexpensive way to have multiple devices on your network all tunnel their traffic through a VPN service provider without having to configure each device individually. In the effort to make connecting to a VPN as simple as possible, users are given the option to purchase a VPN service with the router preconfigured to work with that service.

"In light of the ever growing number of attacks on civil liberties, privacy, and encryption, ThinkPenguin is excited to announce this privacy-enhancing product,” said Christopher Waid, president of ThinkPenguin, Inc. “We've developed the Wireless-N Mini Router to make it easier for users to adopt privacy friendly VPN providers no matter what the user's level of technical expertise."

Purchasing a VPN subscription through ThinkPenguin is not required, and ThinkPenguin is creating detailed documentation to help users to configure their device to connect to the VPN service provider of their choice.

"One of the FSF's short term goals is that we can have at last one RYF certified product for each class of computing device that people use in their day-to-day lives. With this VPN-dedicated mini-router, we now have a way of encouraging people to enhance the security and privacy of each of their wireless-enabled RYF certified devices, which is especially useful for embedded devices not designed to run their own free software VPN client," said FSF's licensing & compliance manager, Joshua Gay.

Those purchasing the TPE-R1100 can choose to pay a little more to flash the latest version of LibreCMC, and the proceeds of that purchase will go toward supporting the development of LibreCMC.

To learn more about Respects Your Freedom hardware certification, including details on the certification of the TPE-R1100, visit https://www.fsf.org/ryf. Hardware sellers interested in applying for certification can consult https://www.fsf.org/resources/hw/endorsement/criteria.

Subscribers to the FSF's Free Software Supporter newsletter will receive announcements about future Respects Your Freedom products.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About ThinkPenguin, Inc

Started by Christopher Waid, founder and CEO, ThinkPenguin, Inc., is a consumer-driven company with a mission to bring free software to the masses. At the core of company is a catalog of computers and accessories with broad support for GNU/Linux. The company provides technical support for end-users and works with the community, distributions, and upstream projects to make GNU/Linux all that it can be.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Media Inquires
ThinkPenguin, Inc.
+1 (888) 39 THINK (84465) x703
media@thinkpenguin.com

###

Catégories: News

Free Software Foundation submits comment to Copyright Office with over 1200 co-signers calling for end to DMCA anti-circumvention provisions

Free Software Foundation - mar, 08/03/2016 - 16:40


This work by Christi Vandermale is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

The Copyright Office was seeking comments in response to a request from Congress to study the effects of the DMCA's anti-circumvention provisions and the triennial exemptions process. The DMCA's anti-circumvention provisions create legal penalties for the circumvention of technologies that restrict access to copyrighted works, known as Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). It further criminalizes the sharing of tools needed to avoid DRM. The DMCA also set up a system where activists, academics and researchers may request that certain uses be exempted from the anti-circumvention provisions. Every three years they may submit a request to the Copyright Office that the circumvention of a particular type of work be free from the DMCA's penalties. Even when an exemption is granted, it expires three years later when the next round of the exemptions process begins, requiring repeated effort to maintain narrow exemptions.

In response, the FSF published a comment and called on people in the United States to co-sign that comment through its Defective By Design campaign to end the use of DRM. Over 1200 people in the United States heeded the call and co-signed the comment. In addition, the FSF asked users in the international community to advocate with their local governments about the dangers of DRM.

The FSF's comment detailed the damaging effects of DRM on all users, and called for the repeal of the DMCA's anti-circumvention provisions and to bring an end to the exemptions process. The comment explained how DRM is about the restriction of computer-users, not enforcing rights. DRM does not respect the rights of users, and gives the DRM implementer a degree of power not envisioned even under copyright law. It permits companies and governments to spy on users, prevent them from controlling their own computing, and abrogates users' rights to even legally permitted copying and modification of copyrighted materials. It interferes with the work of academics and librarians, preventing them from studying and archiving works. It prevents security researchers from discovering vulnerabilities and fraud, as was the case when Volkswagen used software to defeat emission control tests.

Given all the damage DRM causes, a law that enforces DRM and creates legal penalties for trying to avoid its harms is untenable. No system of exemptions can fix a fundamentally broken law.

"DRM is used to restrict and spy on users. Any use of DRM harms users, so no system of exemptions, no matter how perfectly run, can ever solve the problems the DMCA causes," said FSF's executive director, John Sullivan.

In addition to the comments, the FSF provided the Copyright Office with a letter calling for a mechanism to submit comments electronically without the use of proprietary software. Currently, comments submitted digitally to federal agencies that participate in the eRulemaking Program require submission via the Regulations.gov interface. This interface requires the use of JavaScript that is not freely licensed, meaning that it is proprietary software.

When software is proprietary, that means that some company or individual claims ownership of it, and through that ownership claim, imposes restrictions on users as to how they can or can't use the software. When the government requires citizens run such software, it is requiring that they accept the specific and arbitrary terms imposed by that company. The FSF's letter stresses that citizens should not be required to engage with any particular private company in order to participate in public proceedings, or use any governmental Web sites or network service.

Unlike other government agencies, the Copyright Office refused to accept comments even via the post. The Copyright Office is effectively denying all citizens the ability to communicate with their government. As such, the FSF was forced to hand-deliver the comment and signatures.

"This situation is completely unjust and the Copyright Office's behavior is simply reprehensible. No one should be forced to use proprietary software simply to communicate with their government. Hand-delivering documents to an office in Washington D.C. is not possible for the vast majority of people in this country. The Copyright Office and all government agencies must provide a way to submit comments that does not require proprietary software," said FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Joshua Gay.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About Defective By Design

Defective by Design is the Free Software Foundation's campaign against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media, creating a good that is defective by design. DRM requires the use of proprietary software and is a major threat to computer user freedom. It often spies on users as well. The campaign, based at defectivebydesign.org, organizes anti-DRM activists for in-person and online actions, and challenges powerful media and technology interests promoting DRM. Supporters can donate to the campaign at https://www.defectivebydesign.org/donate.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing and Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Catégories: News

Edward Snowden will kick off LibrePlanet 2016 in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Free Software Foundation - mer, 27/01/2016 - 22:50

The annual free software conference will kick off at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Stata Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts on the morning of Saturday, March 19th with "The last lighthouse: Free software in dark times", in which Snowden (who will appear via a free software live video stream) and Daniel Kahn Gillmor will discuss free software, surveillance, power, and control of the future.


Daniel Kahn Gillmor
This work by Daniel Kahn Gillmor is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


Edward Snowden
Screenshot of Citizen Four by Praxis Films. by Laura Poitras is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

"We're thrilled and honored to be hosting this conversation. Edward Snowden has ignited desperately needed discussion around the world about the meaning of privacy, the power of governments and large corporations, and the impact of secretive technology on our freedom. I can't think of a more powerful way to launch this year's conference, and I can't wait to see what great things the LibrePlanet community of activists and developers will do with the energy," said FSF's executive director John Sullivan.

Edward Snowden is a former intelligence officer who served the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), NSA, and Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) for nearly a decade as a subject matter expert on technology and cybersecurity. In 2013, he revealed the NSA was unconstitutionally seizing the private records of billions of individuals who had not been suspected of any wrongdoing, resulting in the largest debate about reforms to US surveillance policy since 1978. Today, he works on methods of enforcing human rights through the application and development of new technologies. He joined the board of Freedom of the Press Foundation in February 2014.

Daniel Kahn Gillmor is a technologist with the ACLU's Speech, Privacy and Technology Project, and a free software developer. He's a Free Software Foundation Associate member, a member of Debian, a contributor to a wide range of free software projects, and a participant in protocol development standards organizations like the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), with an eye toward preserving and improving civil liberties and civil rights through our shared infrastructure.

For the third year in a row, LibrePlanet will be held at MIT's Stata Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on March 19th and 20th, 2016. Co-presented by the Free Software Foundation and MIT's Student Information Processing Board (SIPB), the rest of the LibrePlanet program will be announced soon.

Registration for LibrePlanet is now open. Admission to the conference is gratis for FSF members and students.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software — particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants — and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Georgia Young
Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
georgia@fsf.org

Catégories: News

What's your vision for the FSF? Fill out our survey

Free Software Foundation - sam, 09/01/2016 - 03:05

We continue to rely on the expertise of the free software movement to inform our initiatives and strategies. Taking the first step into our next thirty years, we want to hear your feedback, your suggestions, and your vision for the future of the FSF.

Fill out the survey now!

The survey takes only five to fifteen minutes to complete, and it will be up until the end of January. The FSF eagerly awaits the results, and we plan to publicly share insights from them.

It's important that this survey reach a large and diverse range of people who use free software or care about it. Please share it by whatever means will reach your friends best — social media (hashtag #fsfsurvey), email, IRC, or word of mouth.

One more thing: Our yearly fundraiser is ending soon. We need to raise $450,000 by the end of January to continue being a guiding light for free software and to turn the results of this survey into action. Please become a member for $10 a month, or make a one-time donation to help us reach our goal.

Media Contacts

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942 x31
campaigns@fsf.org

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software — particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants — and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Catégories: News

Self-destructing virus kills off PCs

OSDir.com - mer, 13/05/2015 - 12:59
From the Self Awareness dept.:
A computer virus that tries to avoid detection by making the machine it infects unusable has been found.
Catégories: News

Debian 8 "Jessie" Released

OSDir.com - mer, 13/05/2015 - 12:59
From the Girl dept.:
After almost 24 months of constant development the Debian project is proud to present its new stable version 8 (code name Jessie), which will be supported for the next 5 years thanks to the combined work of the Debian Security team and of the Debian Long Term Support team.
Catégories: News

Linux 4.0 Kernel Released

OSDir.com - mer, 13/05/2015 - 12:59
From the 4.0 dept.:
Linus: "So I decided to release 4.0 as per the normal schedule, because there really weren't any known issues, and while I'll be traveling during the end of the upcoming week due to a college visit, I'm hoping that won't affect the merge window very much. We'll see.

Linux 4.0 was a pretty small release both in linux-next and in final size, although obviously "small" is all relative. It's still over 10k non-merge commits. But we've definitely had bigger releases (and judging by linux-next v4.1 is going to be one of the bigger ones)."
Catégories: News
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