News

The Linux desktop, thanks to Chromebooks, goes retail

ZDNet Open Source - jeu, 28/06/2012 - 21:35
Thanks to Google and the Chromebook, the Linux desktop is getting its chance to make a retail come-back.
Catégories: News

The Linux desktop, thanks to Chromebooks, goes retail

ZDNet Open Source - jeu, 28/06/2012 - 21:35

Start looking now for Google Chromebooks at your local retailers.

At Google I/O , Google’s Senior VP of Chrome and Apps, Sundar Pichaihasm announced that Samsung’s Series 3 Chromebox and Series 5 Chromebook will soon be available in Best Buy stores in the US and Dixons in the UK.

Contrary to what some people are saying, this is far from the first time that Linux-powered PCs have been sold by major retailers. Back in 2008, Best Buy, Sears, and Wal-Mart were all selling Linux desktops. These were all netbooks—low-powered, low-priced laptops. At the time, Microsoft was still trying to talk people into using Vista and people hated Vista.

Microsoft eventually realized that no one was buying Vista at the low-end, and darn few people at at any end really, and so they brought back Windows XP Home in the end of 2008. Microsoft followed this up by selling XP Home at below cost to original equipment manufacturers to kill off the Linux netbook market. Microsoft was successful. By May 2010, ASUS, which had been desktop Linux’s biggest OEM supporter, quietly abandoned the Linux netbook.

That was in 2008. This is 2012.

Google is a much bigger player than gOS, Linspire or Xandros, the leading netbook desktop Linux distributors of the netbook day. In addition, none of Microsoft’s PC partners then wanted to fight with their biggest partner.

In recent weeks, Microsoft has betrayed its partners. And, like Vista before it, Windows 8 is an operating system that even Microsoft’s biggest fans are having trouble loving it.

Chromebooks aren’t just for the retail market . Other companies, like Pano Logic, are offering Chrome PCs to business customers.

You might wonder how a Linux, cloud-based system like the Chromebook’s Chrome OS can really find a consumer or business market since it requires you to be online. Well, you see, Chrome OS doesn’t need to an Internet connection to work now.

You’ve long been able to use Google Mail offline and, as of today, the word processing side of Google Docs can work off-line. Google also said that its other office-suite services, such as Google Presentations and Spreadsheets will soon be available off-line as well. Last, but by no means least, Google Drive has also been extended to Chrome OS. That means anything you store on your cloud drive will also be available on your off-line Chromebook.

In short, Chrome OS, and Chromebooks, are transforming from Linux-based, thin-client systems to full competitors with Windows systems. Would that be enough to get people to switch if their main choice was their pick of Windows 7 PCs? Probably not. But, when your choice will be Windows 8 systems, well, like Vista before it showed, customers may prove to not be that loyal to Microsoft after all.

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Windows 8’s downfall still doesn’t give Linux a chance


Pano Logic in Google Chrome ‘zero-client’ business pitch


Microsoft: The Evil Empire re-Surfaces


The new Chromebooks rock and cr-48 owners will have less to envy in a month

Catégories: News

Red Hat sheds little light on OpenStack plans, hedges bets with RHEV,oVirt

ZDNet Open Source - jeu, 28/06/2012 - 20:08
Red Hat claims it is the No. 3 backer of OpenStack (in terms of code contribution) and a Platinum members of the 180-plus member OpenStack organization but it still won't say when it plans to ship an OpenStack distribution.
Catégories: News

Red Hat sheds little light on OpenStack plans, hedges bets with RHEV,oVirt

ZDNet Open Source - jeu, 28/06/2012 - 20:08

Red Hat claims it is the No. 3 backer of OpenStack (in terms of code contribution) and a Platinum members of the 180-plus member OpenStack organization but it still won’t say when it plans to ship an OpenStack distribution.

Is it hedging its bets?  Is the company saying OpenStack is not ready yet?

Seems like yes to both.

At its annual summit, the Linux company said OpenStack is a “work in progress” and offered up that there is some overlap of functionality with the company sponsored oVirt next generation virtualization platform/open management framework and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) platforms.

But execs clearly nixed any notion that there’s overlap with the company’s brand new CloudForms hybrid cloud platform.

So how should customers pick what’s right for them?

“oVirt is for data center virtualization … things that require more high availability and to migrate applications from one node to another or for an application with specific hardware needs,” answered Red Hat cloud exec Perry Myers to a packed room at the summit Thursday.

“We see RHEV on one end with data center virtualization and OpenStack on the other end with public clouds… and then there’s a middle cloudier area,” Myers said. “But also RHEV is shipping now and OpenStack is not yet.”

The exec said OpenStack is not competitive with CloudForms.

“We see [CloudForms] as complementary to both. RHEV and OpenStack create clouds and CloudForms creates hybrid clouds that sit on top of those,” Myers said.

So how should enterprises proceed?

As he said, RHEV 3.0, which was made available earlier this year, is here now and OpenStack is not.

So, that means customers could deploy RHEV … or deploy Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.3 and deploy OpenStack on top of that, Myers told hundreds of attendees packed into the modest room at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston.

“OpenStack is still somewhat immature and rapidly evolving,” Myers said, noting customers can deploy OpenStack on RHEL 6.3 in experimental fashion but it won’t be production ready until the company does hardware certification and can offer global support.

When will that be?

“At the next level [is] providing support for OpenStack,” Myers said. “We are committed to providing it but we’re not offering a roadmap for a supportable OpenStack product [but] using RHEL and KVM as an underlying OS [for OpenStack] is a good combination. ”

Earlier, Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens seemed to hint during his keynote at what some others claim — that the OpenStack project is not yet totally neutral.

“Within the next few months, [there will be] an official foundation formed [that is] neutrally governed and not just about what is the API but we now have to build clouds on the exact same open source technology and consistency in API and behavior,” Stevens said during his keynote.

The next release of OpenStack, dubbed ‘Folsom,” is due in October. During a recent meeting on plans for that release, Rackspace execs said it would be the last OpenStack summit organized by Rackspace.

In the interim, Red Hat is working on a number of technologies for possible contibution to next generation OpenStack including “Heat,” similar to cloud formations and cloud watch from Amazon as well as a Gluster UFO or SWIFT interface for Gluster storage and Gluster Storage and Replication.

Red Hat is also working on a Filesystem-as-a-Service (FaaS), installation and provisoning tools, OpenShift on OpenStack and “Quantum” (networking-as-a-service module in Folsom] generalization for oVirt.

Catégories: News

Red Hat acquires FuseSource

ZDNet Open Source - mer, 27/06/2012 - 23:55
Red Hat announced that it was buying FuseSource, an open source integration and messaging framework, from Progress Software.
Catégories: News

Red Hat acquires FuseSource

ZDNet Open Source - mer, 27/06/2012 - 23:55

Red Hat is adding FuseSource to its middleware stack.

FuseSource is one of those companies that makes software frameworks that big businesses use every day, but chances are you’ve never heard of them. Linux giant Red Hat however, did know about them and brought them from parent company Progress Software.

FuseSource is a provider of open-source application integration and messaging frameworks and services. FuseSource’s products are based on Apache ServiceMix, Apache ActiveMQ, Apache CXF and Apache Camel. The name of the game with all these programs is to provide a  enterprise service bus (ESB). This is part of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) model. An SOA, in turn, is a way to get programs to work with each other without being tightly coupled together. So, for example, you could use FuseSource programs and its services to get a Windows .NET Web-based application to work with a Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP/Perl/Python (LAMP) program.

Red Hat plans to use FuseSource to accelerate the delivery of application integration products and services to enterprise customers. In a statement, Craig Muzilla, vice president and general manager of middleware at Red Hat said, “Application integration software is one of the fastest growing segments of the enterprise software market, As cloud computing becomes more prevalent, enterprise customers are demanding greater application integration to enable seamless use of cloud computing. With the addition of FuseSource to our middleware portfolio, we will enable customers to experience greater integration capabilities and flexibility. FuseSource’s technologies, expertise, and commitment to open source make them a great fit.”

As Red Hat moves more and more into the cloud space, being able to supply ESB software and services to their cloud customers should serve them well. Red Hat already has some ESB services in its JBoss middlware but the FuseSource acquisition will vastly expand its capabilities. Red Hat also plans on integrating FuseSource and JBoss’ ESB services.

Along with the company and software, Red Hat will also add FuseSource’s technical leadership. This includes highly respected Apache open-source contributors. Thy are expected to continue to play important roles in the Apache community projects.

Red Hat expects the deal to be finalized this summer.

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Catégories: News

Red Hat launches Hybrid Iaas, Cloud Bundles with one price per VM guest

ZDNet Open Source - mer, 27/06/2012 - 17:42
Red Hat announced a series of integrated cloud solutions including Red Hat Hybrid Iaas, Red Hat Cloud with Virtualization Bundle and Red Hat OpenShift Enterprise Paas solutions which will be offered at one price per guest. One of the solutions will be priced at $500 per guest with cloud management included
Catégories: News

Red Hat launches Hybrid Iaas, Cloud Bundles with one price per VM guest

ZDNet Open Source - mer, 27/06/2012 - 17:42

Red Hat’s almost singular goal this week is to position itself as the most open, robust and least expensive cloud provider, in spite of its fairly recent decision to switch to OpenStack as a standard open source cloud platform

At its annual summit in Boston, the Raleigh, NC based Linux leader said OpenStack is important but it is only one piece of the overall cloud stack.

To that end, Red hat will deliver a line of integrated prepackaged solutions that integrate virtualization, cloud management, operating system and public cloud capabilities that will be available later this summer, executives said Wednesday.

The four solutions include two Red Hat OpenShift Enterprise PaaS offerings, the Red Hat Hybrid Iaas and Red Hat Cloud with Virtualization Bundle.

The solutions will be offered as one price per guest — at $500 per guest for one of those solutions– to simplify ROI analysis.

Red Hat claims that price is less expensive than what it costs to deploy one VM guest on VMware’s VSphere virtualization platform with no cloud capabilities.

“Build an open hybrid cloud out of all your resources,” said Bryan Che, a senior director at Red Hat, noting that customers ought to have a choice of their infrastructure, hypervisor and public cloud provider. “It’s one SKU to buy and one SKU to manage … We’ll make it easy to consume and use.”

“OpenStack is extremely popular and Red Hat is a Platinum sponsor of the OpenStack Foundation,” Che said during his address at the summit. “OpenStack should be part of a broader open hybrid cloud. You can’t just put out a cloud and migrate everything to it.”

When asked publicly, however, Red Hat would not say when its anticipated OpenStack enterprise Linux distribution will ship,

Red Hat’s virtualization and cloud portfolio is growing rapidly, as evidenced by key announcements this week and more recently.

In recent weeks, the Linux leader — which debuted Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.0 for Servers and Desktops in January — announced in June alone availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.3 and CloudForms as well as new OpenShift pricing and models.

Red Hat also launched at the summit this week its forthcoming set of integrated cloud solutions as well as Red Hat Storage 2.0  and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.1.

“You can move to the cloud for what VMware charges you for virtualization,”Che said. “It’s $500 per guest for cloud mmanagement included. vSphere pricing is about $510 just for virtualization technology.”

This week, Red Hat announced global availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.3 with enhanced virtualization, scalability, security and developer capabilities.

Version 6.3, for instance offers “Virt-P2V tools that can easily convert a Red Hat Enterprise Linux or Microsoft Windows system running on physical hardware to run as KVM guests,” Red Hat announced.in a press release.

It also  offers more scalability ” by increasing the maximum number of virtual CPUs (vCPUs) per guest to 160 from 64. This is significantly higher than the 32 vCPU per guest limit for VMware ESX 5.0.”

The Red Hat OpenShift PaaS, which competes aginst VMware’s Cloud Foundry, has been available in developer preview since May of 2011 and the company has announced its fee-based service will be available this fall.

In addition, Red Hat said it would make available three models of PaaS to serve various enteprise application development needs on its public OpenShift Paas or implementing a Private PaaS solution with OpenShift on-premise: a devOps model, an ITOps model, self-managed .

The company also plans to debut soon RHEV Manager 3.1 with enhancements to web administration, quotes, task management, permissions, storage, network reports, SDK and CLI, Red Hat’s web site detailed.

At the summit, Red Hat also announced an expanded relationship with SAP to help migrate enterprise SAP applications on Red Hat servers running its virtualization and cloud offerings.

Additionally, Red Hat’s JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 6.0, which became generally available last week, is now available in OpenShift.com’s developer preview, the company announced.

Catégories: News

IBM: Open source is not winning the war in virtualization, cloud ... yet

ZDNet Open Source - mer, 27/06/2012 - 02:04
One IBM VP said open source is the key to virtualization, the cloud and big data computing but there are still key challenges to overcoming proprietary giants
Catégories: News

IBM: Open source is not winning the war in virtualization, cloud ... yet

ZDNet Open Source - mer, 27/06/2012 - 02:04

Open source is driving much of the innovation in the tech sector but there are key challenges in virtualization, cloud and big data, one IBM exec observed during his keynote at the Red Hat Summit tonight.

“We have to get to open virtualization. There is still a lot of churn in this world and when it comes back to virtualization and the cloud, too many people are trying to control the pieces. A VM is not a VM is not a VM. There are too many variations and clients are struggling with that. KVM here is very important,” said IBM Vice President Robert LeBlanc, about the open source hypervisor incorporated in Linux and backed by Red Hat.

“Open virtualization is not winning the war of virtualization. Other innovations are pushing the envelope faster than KVM and we need to bring it to the next level,” he said, noting that IBM helped Dutch Cloud move from VMware to a KVM-based infrastructure and the ROI is impressive.

An open cloud is also paramount, he added, noting that the value of cloud computing is clear but the winning technology is not yet decided. “OpenStack is really important,” LeBlanc said, noting that Red Hat and IBM are among 178 corporate supporters of OpenStack today. “We’ll see more and more client demand for an open world as it relates to the cloud.

“We’re just at the cusp of the power of the cloud,” LeBlanc said, noting that IBM surveys revealed that only three percent of virtualized servers in a typical data center routinely move virtual machines from one server to another depending on computing needs. “The CEO doesn’t know the cloud from an anthill but they know technology is the difference maker.”

Open source, namely Hadoop, is the driving technology in the big data front but there are still big challenges in the volume, variety and veracity of that data, he noted.

Catégories: News

Red Hat: Open source is driving innovation and the information economy -- but battle is not over

ZDNet Open Source - mer, 27/06/2012 - 01:36
Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst said the standardization -- aka commoditization or componentization -- of technology though the open source model has catapulted the information age into an information economy -- but the battle against proprietary vendors is not over.
Catégories: News

Red Hat: Open source is driving innovation and the information economy -- but battle is not over

ZDNet Open Source - mer, 27/06/2012 - 01:36

The information age is finally evolving into the information economy because of the standardization enabled by Linux and open source — but it’s still a battle, Red Hat’s CEO said.

The computer was invented roughly 60 years ago but only now are we seeing dramatic innovations, particularly in the cloud, mobile, and big data sectors — which are run largely next generation open source architectures, he said.

“One of the key reasons is we’re finally seeing componentization happening,” Jim Whitehurst told thousands gathered in Boston for the Linux leader’s annual summit. “More innovation will happen first in open source and that’s a radical change from even five years ago.”

He’s talking, of course, about the standardization, or the componentization, or the commoditization, if you will, of the underlying computing platform upon which innovation happens.

Big data was not driven by a vendor but by end users and the open source project Hadoop. Cloudera is one vendor innovating on top of that platform but it does not control Hadoop, the Red Hat CEO noted.

Whitehurst, a former airline exec, likened Linux and open source (the LAMP stack) to the nuts and bolts and other standardized pieces of machinery that led to the explosion of innovation in the industrial age — such as the development of combustible engines and jet planes.

Linux and open source is driving the next generation information economy but the battle is not over. Proprietary vendors are still trying to control the code, the means of production, and that grip must be loosened to drive more substantial innovation.

“Open source has gone mainstream … open source is the default choice of the next generation IT architecture,” he said, adding that if proprietary companies were able to patent nuts and bolts or own the copyrights to a screwdriver, jet engines might never have existed.

“The decisions we make over the next few years [are critical] … if we have a new architecture with an old business model it still does not get us there.

“This will be a battle,” he claimed. “Openness, standardization, commoditization is not done and it’s a battle we’ll continue to fight over the next few years.”

Red Hat this year surpassed the $1 billion marker. Open source has become the default choice for next generation IT architectures. Innovation in the cloud, mobile and big data markets is happening first (aside from Apple) in open source.

The battles will continue but I’d say the war is won.

Catégories: News

Red Hat: Open source is driving innovation, the information economy but battle is not over

ZDNet Open Source - mer, 27/06/2012 - 01:36

The information age is finally evolving into the information economy because of the standardization enabled by Linux and open source — but it’s still a battle, Red Hat’s CEO said.

The computer was invented roughly 60 years ago but only now are we seeing dramatic innovations, particularly in the cloud, mobile, and big data sectors — which are run largely next generation open source architectures, he said.

“One of the key reasons is we’re finally seeing componentization happening,” Jim Whitehurst told thousands gathered in Boston for the Linux leader’s annual summit. “More innovation will happen first in open source and that’s a radical change from even five years ago.”

He’s talking, of course, about the standardization, or the componentization, or the commoditization, if you will, of the underlying computing platform upon which innovation happens.

Big data was not driven by a vendor but by end users and the open source project Hadoop. Cloudera is one vendor innovating on top of that platform but it does not control Hadoop, the Red Hat CEO noted.

Whitehurst, a former airline exec, likened Linux and open source (the LAMP stack) to the nuts and bolts and other standardized pieces of machinery that led to the explosion of innovation in the industrial age — such as the development of combustible engines and jet planes.

Linux and open source is driving the next generation information economy but the battle is not over. Proprietary vendors are still trying to control the code, the means of production, and that grip must be loosened to drive more substantial innovation.

“Open source has gone mainstream … open source is the default choice of the next generation IT architecture,” he said, adding that if proprietary companies were able to patent nuts and bolts or own the copyrights to a screwdriver, jet engines might never have existed.

“The decisions we make over the next few years [are critical] … if we have a new architecture with an old business model it still does not get us there.

“This will be a battle,” he claimed. “Openness, standardization, commoditization is not done and it’s a battle we’ll continue to fight over the next few years.”

Red Hat this year surpassed the $1 billion marker. Open source has become the default choice for next generation IT architectures. Innovation in the cloud, mobile and big data markets is happening first (aside from Apple) in open source.

The battles will continue but I’d say the war is won.

Catégories: News

Mozilla announces Firefox for Android

ZDNet Open Source - mar, 26/06/2012 - 18:53
Mozilla today announced availability of its much anticipated Firefox open source browser for Android, effectively giving its key financial backer, Google, a run for its money on the mobile browser front.
Catégories: News

Mozilla announces Firefox for Android

ZDNet Open Source - mar, 26/06/2012 - 18:53


Mozilla jumped on the Google I/O bandwagon by announcing availability of its much anticipated Firefox browser for Android.

The non-profit open source foundation claims the new mobile browser is speedier than the native Android browser on Google’s smartphone/tablet code and offers a host of performance, security and usability improvements, including a new Awesome Screen interface and support for Flash for videos and game playing.

The Awesome Screen is enabled by Firefox Sync and brings bookmarks, history and settings to Android devices. Mozilla also optimized the tabbed browsing, Sync and add-ons functionality for mobile browsing and integrated in new HTML 5 capabilities and key security features of its desktop offering such as Do Not Track, Master Password and HTTP Strict Transport Security.

It will be interesting to watch uptake of Firefox, which had been the only top open source browser until Google’s Chrome started making serious headway on the desktop and on mobile devices.

Google’s recent infusion of more cash into Mozilla and Mozilla’s own re-energized Firefox design efforts seem to ensure that the open source browser will remain alive and well for some time to come, regardless of how well Google’s own Chrome browser adoption accelerates on Android devices.

“The new Firefox for Android gives people a powerful mobile Web with faster start-up time, a new look and feel, Flash support and Firefox Sync to give you access to Awesome Bar history, saved passwords, bookmarks and open tabs across your computers and Android phone,” Mozilla announced Tuesday. “Firefox for Android is super speedy and highly customizable, and touts industry-leading privacy and security features.”

Catégories: News

Google appears to aim low with new 7-inch Android tablet

ZDNet Open Source - lun, 25/06/2012 - 18:01
According to reports, Google and Asus will be releasing a new 7-inch tablet running Android 4.1, Jelly Bean, at this week's Google Input/Ouput conference.
Catégories: News

Google appears to aim low with new 7-inch Android tablet

ZDNet Open Source - lun, 25/06/2012 - 18:01

If the rumors are true, Google's Nexus 7 tablet will compete with the low-end Nook Tablet and Kindle Fire, not Apple's iPad.

If the stories from Gizmodo Australia are true, Google and Asus will be releasing a new 7-inch Android-powered tablet, Nexus 7, at this week’s Google I/O Conference.

We knew Google was going to release a new tablet soon. What we haven’t known is any of the details.

According to sources, this new table will be built by Asus and will be powered by a 1.3Ghz quad-core Tegra 3 processor, with a NVIDIA GeForce 12-core graphics processor unit. It will also have 1GB of RAM and come in two models. The low-price model will retail for $199 and come with 8GBs of solid-state drive (SSD) storage and its high-priced brother will list for $249 and have a 16GB SSD.

For a display, the Nexus 7 will have a 7-inch, In-Plane Switching (IPS) display with a resolution of 1280×800. It will also have a single 1.2Megapixel front-facing camera. For networking it will support the 802.11 family and Near field communication (NFC).

It’s also believed that the Nexus 7 will be the first device to run Android 4.1, Jelly Bean, the next generation of the Android Linux operating system. We don’t know a lot about Jelly Bean. It’s believed to be a relatively minor update of Android 4.0. Jelly Bean’s most interesting new feature, if the stories are true, is that it will support Google’s popular Chrome Web browser. Indeed, there have been some speculation that Jelly Bean will dual-boot with Google’s Chrome operating system.

Regardless of what happens with those rumors, if the core hardware facts are true, the Nexus 7’s will not be competing with the iPad or Microsoft’s vaporware Surface devices. Instead, it’s aiming at the sweet spot that such hybrid tablets/e-readers as Amazon’s Kindle Flame and Barnes & Noble Nook Tablet already occupy.

Will it find success? We don’t know enough yet to say. It is interesting, none-the-less that Google seems to believe that what customers really want is low-priced tablets. That’s a very different take from the high-end approach that Apple has taken and that Microsoft now seems to want to follow.

Related Stories:

Is Surface Microsoft’s last-gasp pitch to keep IT shops Windows-only?

RIM considers split, handset unit sell-off: Palm ‘Groundhog Day?’


If you think Apple competes with Android, you’re wrong.


Microflops: Microsoft Surface RT and 8 tablets


Flurry report on iOS vs. Android allegiance called into question

Catégories: News

Google appears to aims low with new 7-inch Android tablet

ZDNet Open Source - lun, 25/06/2012 - 18:01

If the rumours are true, Google's Nexus 7 tablet will compete with the low-end Nook Tablet and Kindle Fire, not Apple's iPad.

If the stories from Gizmodo Australia are true, Google and Asus will be releasing a new 7-inch Android-powered tablet, Nexus 7, at this week’s Google I/O Conference.

We knew Google was going to release a new tablet soon. What we haven’t known is any of the details.

According to sources, this new table will be built by Asus and will be powered by a 1.3Ghz quad-core Tegra 3 processor, with a NVIDIA GeForce 12-core graphics processor unit. It will also have 1GB of RAM and come in two models. The low-price model will retail for $199 and come with 8GBs of solid-state drive (SSD) storage and its high-priced brother will list for $249 and have a 16GB SSD.

For a display, the Nexus 7 will have a 7-inch, In-Plane Switching (IPS) display with a resolution of 1280×800. It will also have a single 1.2Megapixel front-facing camera. For networking it will support the 802.11 family and Near field communication (NFC).

It’s also believed that the Nexus 7 will be the first device to run Android 4.1, Jelly Bean, the next generation of the Android Linux operating system. We don’t know a lot about Jelly Bean. It’s believed to be a relatively minor update of Android 4.0. Jelly Bean’s most interesting new feature, if the stories are true, is that it will support Google’s popular Chrome Web browser. Indeed, there have been some speculation that Jelly Bean will dual-boot with Google’s Chrome operating system.

Regardless of what happens with those rumors, if the core hardware facts are true, the Nexus 7’s will not be competing with the iPad or Microsoft’s vaporware Surface devices. Instead, it’s aiming at the sweet spot that such hybrid tablets/e-readers as Amazon’s Kindle Flame and Barnes & Noble Nook Tablet already occupy.

Will it find success? We don’t know enough yet to say. It is interesting, none-the-less that Google seems to believe that what customers really want is low-priced tablets. That’s a very different take from the high-end approach that Apple has taken and that Microsoft now seems to want to follow.

Related Stories:

Is Surface Microsoft’s last-gasp pitch to keep IT shops Windows-only?

RIM considers split, handset unit sell-off: Palm ‘Groundhog Day?’


If you think Apple competes with Android, you’re wrong.


Microflops: Microsoft Surface RT and 8 tablets


Flurry report on iOS vs. Android allegiance called into question

Catégories: News

First commercial OpenStack VDI solution debuts

ZDNet Open Source - lun, 25/06/2012 - 17:12
Piston Cloud Computing has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with virtualization optimization ISV GridCentric to produce the first commercially available OpenStack VDI solution based on its enterprise cloud OS.
Catégories: News

First commercial OpenStack VDI solution debuts

ZDNet Open Source - lun, 25/06/2012 - 17:12

Piston Cloud Computing has partnered with GridCentric to produce the first commercially available OpenStack-based VDI solution solution that is secure and cost effective.

On Tuesday, Piston Cloud will announce that it is bundling GridCentric’s Virtual Memory Streaming (VMS) technology with its enterprise OpenStack cloud operating system software to double the numbers of desktops supported per server.

This doubling of density, Piston’s co-founder and CEO says, addresses one of the key stumbling blocks to virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) adoption — storage bottlenecks, which in turn degrade desktop performance.

A typical 20-desktop per server configuration would easily bump to 40 desktops with the VMS technology now bundled with Piston’s Enterprise OS and available as a separate update in six to eight weeks. It’s an on-premise VDI solution.

“It’s where the rubber meets on the road on the desktop [virtualization front],” said Josh McKenty, (shown above) CEO of Piston Cloud, about the exclusive licensing deal with GridCentric, noting that getting performance up to snuff is essential for VDI to enjoy the same growth as server virtualization.

The partnership is not exactly a VDI consortia, as one source described it, but is significant because McKenty is a former NASA Nebula engineer and a pioneer of OpenStack, an open source cloud computing platform that is gaining momentum and corporate support in its battle against established proprietary cloud platforms from VMware, Microsoft and Citrix.

Red Hat is now backing OpenStack and is expected to detail its plans for implementation into its Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) platform this week at its annual summit in Boston.

VDI, which allows corporations to host, deploy and centrally manage desktops from a server, is in its early days but will likely catch on in the next two years as performance bottlenecks are eliminated, McKenty predicts.

OpenStack’s Nova controller offers basic built-in remote desktop protocols and the Keystone component offers some desktop authentication and management features but robust desktop capabilities in the open source cloud OS aren’t expected until 2013, after the release of the “Folsom” version of OpenStack.

The “Folsom” release will offer important storage back end performance improvements but enterprises require much more functionality to implement VDI successfully, McKenty said.

GridCentric, which was founded in 2009, offers virtualization optimization software. Its VMS technology increases the efficiency and scalability of virtual infrastructures. Interestingly, Citrix, a desktop virtualization giant, is one of its GridCentric’s investors.

“Together, Piston Cloud and Gridcentric will unify the disparate components of IT infrastructure, helping enterprise buyers tackle bring-your-own-device (BYOD) challenges and making VDI simpler to deploy and manage, at a much lower CAPEX than competing solutions,” the company said in a statement.

Piston is gaining clout. Recently, the San Francisco OpenStack pioneer announced a partnership with VMware to produce an OpenStack layer for VMware’s open source Cloud Foundry PaaS. Given VDI’s slow acceptance, it will be interesting to see how many customers elect to try out Piston’s solution.

Catégories: News
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