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Free Software Foundation releases FY2015 Annual Report

ven, 12/08/2016 - 00:28

The report is available in low-resolution (2.4 MB PDF) and high-resolution (30.7 MB PDF).

The Annual Report reviews the Foundation's activities, accomplishments, and financial picture. The report examines the impact of the FSF's programs, and FY2015's major events, including LibrePlanet and our thirtieth anniversary.

As with all of the Foundation's activities, the Annual Report was made exclusively using free software, including Scribus, GIMP, Inkscape, and LibreOffice, along with freely licensed fonts and images. The report is released under a CC BY SA 4.0 license.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://my.fsf.org/donate. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Georgia Young
Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942 x 17
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

Web DRM standard moves to next phase of development, FSF's Defective by Design campaign to continue opposition

mer, 06/07/2016 - 22:38

EME (full text) is a proposed technological standard for Web-based Digital Restrictions Management (DRM), digital handcuffs that video-streaming services use to micromanage users' access to legitimately obtained media. As Web users asserted while protesting the W3C's meeting this March, DRM is coercive, disempowering and insulting to users. It also causes broad collateral damage to the health of our digital society. DRM's dark history — from the Sony rootkit malware to draconian anti-circumvention laws — demonstrates that integrating it into Web standards would be nothing but bad for the Web's users. It is predicted to stymie security research, curtail privacy, freedom, and accessibility, and set back the interoperability that is necessary for innovation on the Web. There is considerable dissent about EME within the W3C — staff member Harry Halpin has pledged to resign if it becomes an official standard.

Defective by Design is the FSF's campaign against DRM in all its forms and the aegis for its work against EME. Campaigns manager Zak Rogoff made this statement:

"The W3C and its director, Tim Berners-Lee, are abdicating their responsibility — as stated in their official design principles — to put users first in the design of the Web. We had hoped that Berners-Lee would uphold the vision of inclusion and empowerment that he articulated in his famous Tweet about the Web: 'This is for everyone.' But by allowing EME to continue, he has given license to Netflix, Google and media owners to warp the Web so that it works firstly for them.

We are inspired by the worldwide network of activists who have joined us in our struggle for the freedom-respecting Web we deserve. Defective by Design will continue to escalate our campaign, deploying new and creative forms of resistance until EME is stopped."

The EME standardization effort, sponsored by streaming giants like Google and Netflix, aims to take advantage of the W3C's influence over Web technology to make it cheaper and more efficient to impose DRM systems. As of yesterday, the EME proposal is now upgraded from Working Draft to Candidate Recommendation within the W3C's process. Under the W3C's rules there are at least three more chances to pull the plug on EME before it becomes a ratified standard, also known as a W3C Recommendation.

W3C member organizations wishing to join the campaign against EME are invited to contact Defective by Design at info@defectivebydesign.org. Concerned individuals can start by signing Defective by Design's petition or adding a protest selfie to the growing gallery.

About Defective By Design

Defective by Design is the Free Software Foundation's campaign against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media, creating a good that is defective by design. DRM requires the use of proprietary software and is a major threat to computer user freedom. It often spies on users as well. The campaign, based at defectivebydesign.org, organizes anti-DRM activists for in-person and online actions, and challenges powerful media and technology interests promoting DRM. Supporters can donate to the campaign at https://www.defectivebydesign.org/donate.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software — particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants — and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contact

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942 x31
info@defectivebydesign.org

Catégories: News

LulzBot TAZ 6 3D printer now FSF-certified to respect your freedom

lun, 13/06/2016 - 16:55

In October 2012, the LulzBot AO-100 3D printer became the first hardware product to be awarded use of the FSF's RYF certification mark. Since that time, Aleph Objects, Inc. has continued to release new and improved successors to the AO-100 model, including the AO-101, the Mini, and five successor TAZ models. The latest model, which can be purchased from LulzBot.com, has numerous hardware improvements, including a self-leveling printing bed made of borosilicate glass with a PEI surface, a self-cleaning nozzle system, and an integrated power supply. It uses 100% free software: from the low-level firmware that controls the motors and heats the printing bed, to end-user software, including Cura LulzBot Edition, which allows users to both prepare 3D digital objects for printing as well as control the operation of the 3D printer itself.

"Aleph Objects, Inc. continues to be one of the most innovative and impressive makers of desktop 3D printers in the world, and they have done it without compromising their core values and commitment to computer user freedom," said Joshua Gay, FSF licensing & compliance manager.

"The Free Software Foundation is the preeminent voice advancing technology that respects user freedom. It is a privilege to receive their seal of approval on the new LulzBot TAZ 6 desktop 3D printer," said Jeff Moe, president of Aleph Objects, Inc.

To learn more about the Respects Your Freedom hardware certification program visit https://fsf.org/ryf.

Hardware sellers interested in applying for certification can consult https://www.fsf.org/resources/hw/endorsement/criteria.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Kara Sawinska
Media Contact
Aleph Objects, Inc.
+1 (970) 377 1111
press@lulzbot.com

Catégories: News

LibrePlanet conference videos and slides online: Edward Snowden, Richard Stallman, Karen Sandler, and more

mar, 31/05/2016 - 17:45

All recordings from LibrePlanet 2016 can be found here.

LibrePlanet 2016: Fork the System was held in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Stata Center on March 19 and 20, 2016. Video for the opening keynote with NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and dozens more sessions from the conference – over 25 hours of free software ideas – are available on the FSF's instance of GNU MediaGoblin, a free software media publishing platform that is a decentralized replacement to sites like YouTube and Flickr.

Recorded talks include Free software, free society by Allison Randal, current and past director of multiple foundations in the world of free software; Companies, free software, and you by Karen Sandler, executive director of the Software Freedom Conservancy; The Free Software Awards with a talk by Richard Stallman, founder of the Free Software Foundation; Restore online freedom! by Mike Gerwitz, GNU Project volunteer; and Inessential weirdnesses in free software by Sumana Harihareswara, founder of Changeset Consulting.

The LibrePlanet 2016 program has links to all recorded talks and their accompanying slides. All sessions recorded for LibrePlanet 2016 are now available – 33 talks in all. For more information about how the sessions were recorded with free software, see intern David Testé's post about his experience creating the fully free streaming software package, ABYSS.

LibrePlanet 2016 was produced in partnership by the Free Software Foundation and the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB) at MIT.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software – particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants – and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://my.fsf.org/donate. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Georgia Young
Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

Allies join Defective by Design for the tenth anniversary of the International Day Against DRM

mar, 03/05/2016 - 04:29

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016 -- Today community groups, activist organizations, and businesses are taking part in the International Day Against DRM, celebrating ten years since the first global day of action in 2006. The groups are united in envisioning a world without Digital Restrictions Management (DRM), technology that polices what people can do with digital media by spying on them and compromising their computer security. As the largest anti-DRM event in the world, the International Day Against DRM is intended as a counterpoint to the pro-DRM message broadcast by powerful media and software companies. The Day is coordinated by Defective by Design, a campaign of the Free Software Foundation.

At the time of publication, community members and activists have organized eleven events in Mexico, Bangladesh, Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, and the US. Fifteen organizations are participating, including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Creative Commons, the Document Foundation (home of LibreOffice), and the Free Software Foundation sister organizations in India and Europe. Bookstores and publishers, including O'Reilly Media, are offering sales on DRM-free media

Today Defective by Design released a timeline recounting the first ten years of the International Day Against DRM. Community members are encouraged to continue the timeline by envisioning future victories against DRM on social media.

Zak Rogoff, campaigns manager for the Free Software Foundation said, "Giving its owners power over our cars, medical devices, phones, computers, and more, DRM opens a deep crack in our digital rights and freedoms. That crack will only get wider and more dangerous as our societies continue to interweave with technology. Governments and corporations steer the massive technosocial system that perpetuates DRM and makes it profitable, often steering it away from the best interests of the technology's actual users. Committed to a more ethical technological future, our movement pushes back. Today, looking back on ten years since the first International Day Against DRM, we have a lot of progress to celebrate, and we still have a lot of work to do."

Individuals can participate with a variety of online and in-person actions on dayagainstdrm.org, from DRM-free media purchases to gatherings. To be part of Defective by Design's year-round anti-DRM campaigns, supporters can join the low-volume action alerts email list, the DRM Elimination Crew discussion list and the #dbd IRC channel on Freenode. Media stores, activist organizations and other groups interested in participating in the International Day Against DRM in 2017 should join the email discussion list to get reminders and support when the event is near.

About Defective By Design

Defective by Design is the Free Software Foundation's campaign against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media, creating a good that is defective by design. DRM requires the use of proprietary software and is a major threat to computer user freedom. It often spies on users as well. The campaign, based at defectivebydesign.org, organizes anti-DRM activists for in-person and online actions, and challenges powerful media and technology interests promoting DRM. Supporters can donate to the campaign at https://www.defectivebydesign.org/donate.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

Media Contact

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1-617-542-5942 x31
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

Hundreds explore ways to Fork the System with free software at LibrePlanet 2016

ven, 29/04/2016 - 17:20

Edward Snowden talks with Daniel Kahn Gillmor at LibrePlanet 2016.

At a ceremony on Saturday, March 21st, Free Software Foundation President Richard M. Stallman announced the winners of the FSF's annual Free Software Awards. Two awards were given: the Award for the Advancement of Free Software was presented to Werner Koch for his work on GNU Privacy Guard, the defacto tool for encrypted communication, and the Award for Projects of Social Benefit was presented to the Library Freedom Project, a partnership among librarians, technologists, attorneys, and privacy advocates which aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries.

Software Freedom Conservancy executive director Karen Sandler closed out the conference with "Companies, free software, and you," in which she urged free software developers to push their employers to allow them to retain copyleft on their code.

Software Freedom Conservancy Executive Director Karen Sandler closed out LibrePlanet 2016.

A video of the opening keynote conversation between Edward Snowden and Daniel Kahn Gillmor is available now at http://media.libreplanet.org/u/libreplanet/m/libreplanet-2016-the-last-lighthouse/. Videos of all the conference sessions, along with photographs from the conference, will soon be available on https://media.libreplanet.org, the conference's instance of GNU MediaGoblin, a free software media publishing platform that anyone can run.

LibrePlanet 2016 was produced in partnership by the Free Software Foundation and the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB) at MIT.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://my.fsf.org/donate. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Georgia Young
Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

GNU releases ethical evaluations of code-hosting services

lun, 25/04/2016 - 21:55

The completed evaluations can be viewed on the evaluation page, while the criteria page offers more information on the evaluation process, as well as the criteria themselves.

Repositories are used not only by software developers but also by software users, and they have a large impact on the free software community. The evaluations promote and honor good ethical practices on the part of repositories, and make it easy for users to find services that respect them.

Version 1.0 of the criteria ranks sites on a score from F (unacceptable) to A+ (extra credit). No site has yet received extra credit, but Savannah achieved an A grade. An F grade shows the service has not met even the minimum ethical standards expected for the hosting of a GNU package. GNU's Repo Criteria Discussion list is happy to offer assistance to repository-hosting organizations seeking to improve their service's score.

One service which has passed the criteria is GitLab. "We want to allow everyone to contribute to software. We recognize that many people have a need for free software to do this," said GitLab's CEO Sytse Sijbrandij, adding that "as a former developer myself, I think it is natural that you can contribute to the software you use to collaborate." Many repository sites require the user to run proprietary JavaScript to access their full functionality, but GitLab has addressed this by relicensing its JavaScript as free software.

Savannah, which has also passed these criteria, "host[s] projects for the sake of the ideals of freedom and community that the free software movement stands for," according to its Web site, which also makes clear that "[t]he space given to you on this server is given for the expressed purpose of advancing free software." Savannah is hosted by the FSF but run almost entirely by a dedicated team of volunteers.

Andrew Ferguson, a community member who played a leadership role in the evaluation project, said "More volunteers with coding ability are needed to aid the development of existing repository services to help them meet these criteria. All community members are encouraged to write the administrators of code-hosting services, to build awareness and a motivation to improve their ethical evaluations. GitHub has responded to some requests from the free software community and has recently updated its license chooser to include the GPLv3 license. However more community advocacy is required, as GitHub still fails to meet the criteria."

General discussion regarding the criteria or evaluations can be directed to the libreplanet-discuss mailing list. If you'd like to lend your help evaluating repositories, please join the repo-criteria-discuss list.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942 x31
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

FSF Job Opportunity: Operations Assistant

jeu, 21/04/2016 - 17:25

This position works closely with FSF staff and management to ensure all administrative functions of the FSF run smoothly and efficiently, preserving our 4-star Charity Navigator rating and boosting all areas of our work.

The Operations Assistant is responsible for handling phone calls, managing office operations, and being a friendly face for visitors to our office at the center of Boston's Downtown Crossing. Examples of job responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

  • fulfilling orders for FSF merchandise and related bookkeeping,
  • blogging about merchandise-related news,
  • processing incoming donations,
  • coordinating volunteers,
  • updating our contact database,
  • organizing fundraising mailings, membership mailings, and similar communications,
  • assisting with local and special events, including our annual LibrePlanet conference,
  • assisting with website maintenance, and
  • looking after the office space.

This is a great opportunity for a team-oriented self-starter who thrives on multitasking, is calm under pressure, has an eye for detail, and wants to make a difference. The position must be worked from the Boston office, and the position must be able to lift small to medium-size packages (up to 50 pounds) on a regular basis. With our small staff of thirteen, each person makes a clear contribution. We work hard, but offer a humane and fun work environment.

Because our mission is worldwide, language skills and a demonstrated ability to interact with people across cultures and age groups will be highly valued. While the position does not require advanced computer skills, a willingness to learn and work with new software is a must. We use free software like CiviCRM, Plone, Emacs, and LibreOffice, all running on GNU/Linux.

The FSF is a growing organization and provides great potential for advancement; existing staff get the first chance at any new job openings. Previous Operations Assistants have often gone on to hold other positions within the organization.

Benefits and salary

This job is a union position. The salary is fixed at $51,646/year and is non-negotiable. Other benefits include the following:

  • full family health coverage through Blue Cross/Blue Shield's HMO Blue program,
  • subsidized dental plan,
  • four weeks of paid vacation annually,
  • seventeen paid holidays annually,
  • public transit commuting cost reimbursement,
  • 403(b) program through TIAA-CREF, and
  • yearly cost-of-living pay increases (based on government guidelines).

Resumes and cover letters must be submitted via email to hiring@fsf.org. The email must contain the subject line, "Operations Assistant". Resumes should be attached in text, PDF, or OpenDocument. No Word documents, please. Email submissions that do not follow these instructions will be ignored.

Applications must be received by Friday, May 20, 2016.

The FSF is an equal opportunity employer and will not discriminate against any employee or application for employment on the basis of race, color, marital status, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, handicap, or any other legally protected status recognized by federal, state or local law.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

Catégories: News

Interpreting, enforcing and changing the GNU GPL, as applied to combining Linux and ZFS

lun, 11/04/2016 - 21:03

The FSF's statement explains why the current license of ZFS prevents it from being combined with Linux. To reach that conclusion, the statement covers all the necessary background for understanding license incompatibilities and violations in general.

In January of 2005, the FSF added to its license list an explanation that the Common Development and Distribution License, version 1.0 (CDDL), though a free license, is incompatible with all versions of the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL). While the CDDL is not commonly used, it is the license that Sun Microsystems (and now Oracle) chose for distributing the file system ZFS. ZFS was originally written for Solaris, but recent projects aim to make it work as a module with other operating system kernels, including Linux, which is licensed under the terms of the GNU GPL version 2.

"Normally, incompatibility questions like this are raised by people trying to write proprietary modules for copyleft free programs. They want to benefit from the work done by free software developers without providing others the same freedom, and they treat users unethically. That is not the case here, because ZFS is free software. The ideal solution would be for Oracle, who has become a large and tremendously influential distributor of GPL-covered code, to show their leadership by giving explicit permission allowing their ZFS work to be used under the GPL," said FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Joshua Gay.

FSF's executive director John Sullivan added, "The FSF does not develop Linux and does not presume to tell the developers of Linux when to do GPL enforcement. What we do is provide general materials that make clear the intent behind the GNU family of licenses, and the legal basis for that intent, to create shared and reliable best practices surrounding their use. As this statement makes clear, we support and encourage GPL enforcement work in this area and others when it is done in agreement with these best practices, and in accord with the Principles of Community-Oriented GPL Enforcement."

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About the GNU Operating System and Linux

Richard Stallman announced in September 1983 the plan to develop a free software Unix-like operating system called GNU. GNU is the only operating system developed specifically for the sake of users' freedom. See https://www.gnu.org/gnu/the-gnu-project.html.

In 1992, the essential components of GNU were complete, except for one, the kernel. When in 1992 the kernel Linux was re-released under the GNU GPL, making it free software, the combination of GNU and Linux formed a complete free operating system, which made it possible for the first time to run a PC without non-free software. This combination is the GNU/Linux system. For more explanation, see https://www.gnu.org/gnu/gnu-linux-faq.html.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Catégories: News

Anti-DRM activists go to W3C meeting to protest Digital Restrictions Management in Web standards

mar, 22/03/2016 - 17:55

The protest began outside the W3C office and continued with a march past Google's Cambridge office, to Microsoft's office nearby. The companies are both supporters of Encrypted Media Extensions (EME), the proposal to enshrine DRM in Web standards. The protest included free software users and developers, including Richard Stallman and Chris Webber, the maintainer of the GNU MediaGoblin decentralized publishing platform. A small number of protesters split from the group, their actions were not condoned by the FSF, to enter the W3C meeting but they were ejected by police.

DRM in Web standards would make it cheaper and more politically acceptable to impose restrictions on users, opening the floodgates to a new wave of DRM throughout the Web, with all the vulnerabilities, surveillance and curtailed freedom that DRM entails.

In the week before the protest, Dutch activists held their own demonstration at the Amsterdam W3C office, and a Brazilian Web expert met with staff at the W3C office in São Paulo. Concerned people from around the world posted selfie photos with protest signs against DRM, many in front of other W3C offices. For every person at the protest, there were about five hundred who spoke up online against Encrypted Media Extensions.

"The fight against digital restrictions in Web standards is a new front in the struggle for liberty and expression on the global network. It matters for many of the same reasons as protecting strong encryption and net neutrality, or reigning in online surveillance: increasingly, the Web mediates our politics and our society. We cannot be free without a free Web" said by Zak Rogoff, FSF campaigns manager.

The W3C responded to the pressure with multiple posts on the topic in recent weeks, and participated in a public dialogue about the issue following the protest. The dialogue was hosted by the MIT Media Lab and included Richard Stallman of the Free Software Foundation, Joi Ito of the Media Lab and Danny O'Brien of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). At the public dialogue, W3C staff member Harry Halpin pledged to resign in protest if the standards body recommend Encrypted Media Extensions.

The FSF, EFF and others concerned with Internet and software freedom have been protesting Encrypted Media Extensions since 2013. The Free Software Foundation's opposition to Encrypted Media Extensions has included a petition to Stop the Hollyweb, signed by more than 33,000 people and delivered to the W3C with fanfare, a joint letter signed by 27 organizations, and a boycott against Netflix for its role in developing Encrypted Media Extensions. This work is coordinated through the Foundation's anti-DRM campaign, Defective by Design.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About Defective By Design

Defective by Design is the Free Software Foundation's campaign against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media, creating a good that is defective by design. DRM requires the use of proprietary software and is a major threat to computer user freedom. It often spies on users as well. The campaign, based at defectivebydesign.org, organizes anti-DRM activists for in-person and online actions, and challenges powerful media and technology interests promoting DRM. Supporters can donate to the campaign at https://www.defectivebydesign.org/donate.

Media Contacts

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

Library Freedom Project and Werner Koch are 2015 Free Software Awards winners

dim, 20/03/2016 - 01:55

The Award for Projects of Social Benefit is presented to a project or team responsible for applying free software, or the ideas of the free software movement, in a project that intentionally and significantly benefits society in other aspects of life. This award stresses the use of free software in the service of humanity.

This year, it was given to the Library Freedom Project, a partnership among librarians, technologists, attorneys, and privacy advocates which aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries. By teaching librarians about surveillance threats, privacy rights and responsibilities, and digital tools to stop surveillance, the project hopes to create a privacy-centric paradigm shift in libraries and the local communities they serve. Notably, the project helps libraries launch Tor exit nodes. Project founders Alison Macrina and chief technology wizard Nima Fatemi accepted the award.

The Award for the Advancement of Free Software is given annually to an individual who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of free software.

This year, it was presented to Werner Koch, the founder and driving force behind GnuPG. GnuPG is the defacto tool for encrypted communication. Society needs more than ever to advance free encryption technology. Werner Koch was unable to attend, so the award was accepted on his behalf by David Shaw, a GnuPG contributor since 2002.


About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org


Photo of Werner Koch by Willi Nothers , licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License


Other photos by Kori Feener, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Catégories: News

LibrePlanet free software conference coming to MIT in one week, March 19-20

ven, 11/03/2016 - 23:35

LibrePlanet 2016 will feature sessions for all ages and experience levels, and a promotional video for the event has just been released.

Organized around the theme "Fork the System", the conference's sessions will examine how free software creates the opportunity of a new path for its users, allows developers to fight the restrictions of a system dominated by proprietary software by creating free replacements, and is the foundation of a philosophy of freedom, sharing, and change. Keynote speakers include NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden in conversation with the ACLU's Daniel Kahn Gillmor; Open Source Initiative board president Allison Randal; Free Software Foundation founder Richard Stallman; and Software Freedom Conservancy executive director Karen Sandler.

This year's LibrePlanet conference will feature over 40 sessions, such as Yes, the FCC might ban your operating system, Trans Code: Free software as model & critique of diversity by transgender hackers, and Ending Online Tracking! Privacy Badger and Beyond!, as well as a hands-on workshop showing participants how to use the free software 3-D animation program Blender and a Libreboot install workshop.

"This year's LibrePlanet conference will be our biggest ever, and it's not hard to see why," said Georgia Young, program manager at the Free Software Foundation. "From the conversation with Edward Snowden, to strategy sessions aimed at helping activists use free software in their social change work, to talks encouraging free software advocacy in school and your workplace, the conference offers intriguing ways for anybody to Fork the System."

Due to high demand, advance registration is closed. Attendees may register in person at the event.

About LibrePlanet

LibrePlanet is the annual conference of the Free Software Foundation, and is co-produced by the Student Information Processing Board. What was once a small gathering of FSF members has grown into a larger event for anyone with an interest in the values of software freedom. LibrePlanet is always gratis for associate members of the FSF. To sign up for announcements about LibrePlanet 2016, visit https://www.libreplanet.org/2016.

LibrePlanet 2015 was held at MIT from March 21-22, 2015. Over 350 attendees from all over the world came together for conversations, demonstrations, and keynotes centered around the theme of "Free Software Everywhere." You can watch videos from past conferences at http://media.libreplanet.org.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contact

Georgia Young Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

ThinkPenguin VPN mini-router now FSF-certified to respect your freedom

ven, 11/03/2016 - 01:06

This is the fourth product and second router from ThinkPenguin to achieve RYF certification. The TPE-R1100, just like the TPE-NWIFIROUTER Wireless-N router that was certified in Sept. 2014, runs LibreCMC, an FSF-endorsed GNU/Linux distribution. The TPE-R1100 can be purchased from ThinkPenguin at https://ThinkPenguin.com/TPE-R1100.

The Free Software Wireless-N Mini Router is not intended to replace one's existing wifi router or modem. Instead, it connects to your existing router and provides a simple and inexpensive way to have multiple devices on your network all tunnel their traffic through a VPN service provider without having to configure each device individually. In the effort to make connecting to a VPN as simple as possible, users are given the option to purchase a VPN service with the router preconfigured to work with that service.

"In light of the ever growing number of attacks on civil liberties, privacy, and encryption, ThinkPenguin is excited to announce this privacy-enhancing product,” said Christopher Waid, president of ThinkPenguin, Inc. “We've developed the Wireless-N Mini Router to make it easier for users to adopt privacy friendly VPN providers no matter what the user's level of technical expertise."

Purchasing a VPN subscription through ThinkPenguin is not required, and ThinkPenguin is creating detailed documentation to help users to configure their device to connect to the VPN service provider of their choice.

"One of the FSF's short term goals is that we can have at last one RYF certified product for each class of computing device that people use in their day-to-day lives. With this VPN-dedicated mini-router, we now have a way of encouraging people to enhance the security and privacy of each of their wireless-enabled RYF certified devices, which is especially useful for embedded devices not designed to run their own free software VPN client," said FSF's licensing & compliance manager, Joshua Gay.

Those purchasing the TPE-R1100 can choose to pay a little more to flash the latest version of LibreCMC, and the proceeds of that purchase will go toward supporting the development of LibreCMC.

To learn more about Respects Your Freedom hardware certification, including details on the certification of the TPE-R1100, visit https://www.fsf.org/ryf. Hardware sellers interested in applying for certification can consult https://www.fsf.org/resources/hw/endorsement/criteria.

Subscribers to the FSF's Free Software Supporter newsletter will receive announcements about future Respects Your Freedom products.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About ThinkPenguin, Inc

Started by Christopher Waid, founder and CEO, ThinkPenguin, Inc., is a consumer-driven company with a mission to bring free software to the masses. At the core of company is a catalog of computers and accessories with broad support for GNU/Linux. The company provides technical support for end-users and works with the community, distributions, and upstream projects to make GNU/Linux all that it can be.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Media Inquires
ThinkPenguin, Inc.
+1 (888) 39 THINK (84465) x703
media@thinkpenguin.com

###

Catégories: News

Free Software Foundation submits comment to Copyright Office with over 1200 co-signers calling for end to DMCA anti-circumvention provisions

mar, 08/03/2016 - 16:40


This work by Christi Vandermale is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

The Copyright Office was seeking comments in response to a request from Congress to study the effects of the DMCA's anti-circumvention provisions and the triennial exemptions process. The DMCA's anti-circumvention provisions create legal penalties for the circumvention of technologies that restrict access to copyrighted works, known as Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). It further criminalizes the sharing of tools needed to avoid DRM. The DMCA also set up a system where activists, academics and researchers may request that certain uses be exempted from the anti-circumvention provisions. Every three years they may submit a request to the Copyright Office that the circumvention of a particular type of work be free from the DMCA's penalties. Even when an exemption is granted, it expires three years later when the next round of the exemptions process begins, requiring repeated effort to maintain narrow exemptions.

In response, the FSF published a comment and called on people in the United States to co-sign that comment through its Defective By Design campaign to end the use of DRM. Over 1200 people in the United States heeded the call and co-signed the comment. In addition, the FSF asked users in the international community to advocate with their local governments about the dangers of DRM.

The FSF's comment detailed the damaging effects of DRM on all users, and called for the repeal of the DMCA's anti-circumvention provisions and to bring an end to the exemptions process. The comment explained how DRM is about the restriction of computer-users, not enforcing rights. DRM does not respect the rights of users, and gives the DRM implementer a degree of power not envisioned even under copyright law. It permits companies and governments to spy on users, prevent them from controlling their own computing, and abrogates users' rights to even legally permitted copying and modification of copyrighted materials. It interferes with the work of academics and librarians, preventing them from studying and archiving works. It prevents security researchers from discovering vulnerabilities and fraud, as was the case when Volkswagen used software to defeat emission control tests.

Given all the damage DRM causes, a law that enforces DRM and creates legal penalties for trying to avoid its harms is untenable. No system of exemptions can fix a fundamentally broken law.

"DRM is used to restrict and spy on users. Any use of DRM harms users, so no system of exemptions, no matter how perfectly run, can ever solve the problems the DMCA causes," said FSF's executive director, John Sullivan.

In addition to the comments, the FSF provided the Copyright Office with a letter calling for a mechanism to submit comments electronically without the use of proprietary software. Currently, comments submitted digitally to federal agencies that participate in the eRulemaking Program require submission via the Regulations.gov interface. This interface requires the use of JavaScript that is not freely licensed, meaning that it is proprietary software.

When software is proprietary, that means that some company or individual claims ownership of it, and through that ownership claim, imposes restrictions on users as to how they can or can't use the software. When the government requires citizens run such software, it is requiring that they accept the specific and arbitrary terms imposed by that company. The FSF's letter stresses that citizens should not be required to engage with any particular private company in order to participate in public proceedings, or use any governmental Web sites or network service.

Unlike other government agencies, the Copyright Office refused to accept comments even via the post. The Copyright Office is effectively denying all citizens the ability to communicate with their government. As such, the FSF was forced to hand-deliver the comment and signatures.

"This situation is completely unjust and the Copyright Office's behavior is simply reprehensible. No one should be forced to use proprietary software simply to communicate with their government. Hand-delivering documents to an office in Washington D.C. is not possible for the vast majority of people in this country. The Copyright Office and all government agencies must provide a way to submit comments that does not require proprietary software," said FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Joshua Gay.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About Defective By Design

Defective by Design is the Free Software Foundation's campaign against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media, creating a good that is defective by design. DRM requires the use of proprietary software and is a major threat to computer user freedom. It often spies on users as well. The campaign, based at defectivebydesign.org, organizes anti-DRM activists for in-person and online actions, and challenges powerful media and technology interests promoting DRM. Supporters can donate to the campaign at https://www.defectivebydesign.org/donate.

Media Contacts

Joshua Gay
Licensing and Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Catégories: News

Edward Snowden will kick off LibrePlanet 2016 in Cambridge, Massachusetts

mer, 27/01/2016 - 22:50

The annual free software conference will kick off at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Stata Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts on the morning of Saturday, March 19th with "The last lighthouse: Free software in dark times", in which Snowden (who will appear via a free software live video stream) and Daniel Kahn Gillmor will discuss free software, surveillance, power, and control of the future.


Daniel Kahn Gillmor
This work by Daniel Kahn Gillmor is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


Edward Snowden
Screenshot of Citizen Four by Praxis Films. by Laura Poitras is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

"We're thrilled and honored to be hosting this conversation. Edward Snowden has ignited desperately needed discussion around the world about the meaning of privacy, the power of governments and large corporations, and the impact of secretive technology on our freedom. I can't think of a more powerful way to launch this year's conference, and I can't wait to see what great things the LibrePlanet community of activists and developers will do with the energy," said FSF's executive director John Sullivan.

Edward Snowden is a former intelligence officer who served the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), NSA, and Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) for nearly a decade as a subject matter expert on technology and cybersecurity. In 2013, he revealed the NSA was unconstitutionally seizing the private records of billions of individuals who had not been suspected of any wrongdoing, resulting in the largest debate about reforms to US surveillance policy since 1978. Today, he works on methods of enforcing human rights through the application and development of new technologies. He joined the board of Freedom of the Press Foundation in February 2014.

Daniel Kahn Gillmor is a technologist with the ACLU's Speech, Privacy and Technology Project, and a free software developer. He's a Free Software Foundation Associate member, a member of Debian, a contributor to a wide range of free software projects, and a participant in protocol development standards organizations like the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), with an eye toward preserving and improving civil liberties and civil rights through our shared infrastructure.

For the third year in a row, LibrePlanet will be held at MIT's Stata Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on March 19th and 20th, 2016. Co-presented by the Free Software Foundation and MIT's Student Information Processing Board (SIPB), the rest of the LibrePlanet program will be announced soon.

Registration for LibrePlanet is now open. Admission to the conference is gratis for FSF members and students.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software — particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants — and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Georgia Young
Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
georgia@fsf.org

Catégories: News

What's your vision for the FSF? Fill out our survey

sam, 09/01/2016 - 03:05

We continue to rely on the expertise of the free software movement to inform our initiatives and strategies. Taking the first step into our next thirty years, we want to hear your feedback, your suggestions, and your vision for the future of the FSF.

Fill out the survey now!

The survey takes only five to fifteen minutes to complete, and it will be up until the end of January. The FSF eagerly awaits the results, and we plan to publicly share insights from them.

It's important that this survey reach a large and diverse range of people who use free software or care about it. Please share it by whatever means will reach your friends best — social media (hashtag #fsfsurvey), email, IRC, or word of mouth.

One more thing: Our yearly fundraiser is ending soon. We need to raise $450,000 by the end of January to continue being a guiding light for free software and to turn the results of this survey into action. Please become a member for $10 a month, or make a one-time donation to help us reach our goal.

Media Contacts

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942 x31
campaigns@fsf.org

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software — particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants — and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Catégories: News

The FSF is hiring: Seeking a Boston-area full-time Web Developer

jeu, 07/05/2015 - 21:25

This position, reporting to the executive director, works closely with our sysadmin team to maintain and improve the FSF's Web presence. It's an especially exciting time to join the FSF team, because we will be celebrating our 30th anniversary this October.

The FSF uses several different free software web platforms in the course of its work, both internally and externally. These platforms are critical to work supporting the GNU Project, free software adoption, free media formats, and freedom on the Internet; and to opposing bulk surveillance, Digital Restrictions Management, software patents, and proprietary software.

We are looking for someone who is primarily interested in keeping these systems up-to-date and working, as well as customizing them when necessary. While the main duties will relate to the backend systems, frontend experience with templates, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and design tools will be a big plus.

The Web Developer will also contribute to decisions about which new platforms to use or which existing ones to retire. The infrastructure of www.fsf.org, shop.fsf.org, and audio-video.gnu.org will likely be changed this year, so there will be some critically important research and work to be done right away.

We emphasize opportunities to contribute work done at the FSF to the upstream projects we use, to benefit the broader free software community.

You'll primarily work with:

  • CiviCRM
  • Drupal
  • MediaWiki
  • Plone / Zope
  • Ikiwiki
  • Request Tracker
  • Django / Satchmo
  • Etherpad
  • CAS
  • GNU social
  • GNU MediaGoblin

Because the FSF works globally and seeks to have our materials distributed in as many languages as possible, multilingual candidates will have an advantage. English, German, French, Spanish, Mandarin, Malagasy, and a little Japanese, are represented among current FSF staff.

With our small staff of twelve, each person makes a clear contribution. We work hard, but offer a humane and fun work environment at an office located in the heart of downtown Boston.

The FSF is a mature but growing organization that provides great potential for advancement; existing staff get the first chance at any new job openings. This position is a great starting point for anyone who might be interested in other roles on our technical team in the future.

Benefits and salary

The job must be worked on-site at FSF's downtown Boston office. An on-site interview will be required with the executive director and other team members.

This job is a union position. The salary is fixed at $51,646.40 annually. Other benefits include:

  • conference travel opportunities,
  • full family health coverage through Blue Cross/Blue Shield's HMO Blue program,
  • subsidized dental plan,
  • four weeks of paid vacation annually,
  • seventeen paid holidays annually,
  • public transit commuting cost reimbursement,
  • 403(b) program through TIAA-CREF,
  • yearly cost-of-living pay increases, and
  • potential for an annual performance bonus.
Application instructions

Applications must be submitted via email to hiring@fsf.org. The email must contain the subject line "Web Developer". A complete application should include:

  • resume,
  • cover letter, and
  • links to any previous work online.

All materials must be in a free format (such as plain text, PDF, or OpenDocument, and not Microsoft Word). Email submissions that do not follow these instructions will probably be overlooked. No phone calls, please.

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until the position is filled. To guarantee consideration, submit your application by Wednesday, May 27th, 10:00AM EDT.

The FSF is an equal opportunity employer and will not discriminate against any employee or application for employment on the basis of race, color, marital status, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, handicap, or any other legally protected status recognized by federal, state or local law. We value diversity in our workplace.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Catégories: News

Community is the focus of 2015's International Day Against DRM

mar, 05/05/2015 - 23:40

The groups are united in envisioning a world without Digital Restrictions Management (DRM), technology that places arbitrary restrictions on what people can do with digital media, often by spying on them. As the largest anti-DRM event in the world, the International Day Against DRM is an important counterpoint to the pro-DRM message broadcast by powerful media and software companies. The Day is coordinated by Defective by Design, the anti-DRM campaign of the Free Software Foundation.

This year, community members are the highlight of the Day. Activists have organized twelve events in Bangladesh, Canada, England, Guatemala, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, the US, and Greece (as of May 5th).

Events in at least nine countries. See dayagainstdrm.org for the most up-to-date list.

Four individuals with unique perspectives also worked with Defective by Design to write community posts: two blind anti-DRM activists, an anti-DRM tech librarian, and a social scientist/activist analyzing the rise of DRM in streaming media services.

Bookstores and publishers, including O'Reilly Media, are offering sales on DRM-free media and advocacy organizations allied with Defective by Design will also be making official statements. Activists in Russia, Romania, and France have already translated the anti-DRM flyer into their native languages, and more translations are in progress. More groups are expected to join on the day itself.

Zak Rogoff, campaigns manager for the Free Software Foundation, said "Powerful entertainment and technology companies use DRM to restrict our use of digital media, demanding control over our computers and network connections in the process. Our community is doing everything we can to organize and build tools to protect our freedom. Our opponents are strong enough to have the government on their side in most countries, but when we come together, we are strong too."

Individuals can participate with a variety of online and in-person actions on dayagainstdrm.org, from media downloads to gatherings. To be part of Defective by Design's year-round anti-DRM campaigns, supporters can join the low-volume Action Alerts email list or join the discussion on the email discussion list or #dbd IRC channel. Media stores, activist organizations and other groups interested in participating in the International Day Against DRM today or in 2016 should contact info@defectivebydesign.org.

About Defective By Design

Defective by Design is the Free Software Foundation's campaign against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media, creating a good that is defective by design. DRM requires the use of proprietary software and is a major threat to computer user freedom. It often spies on users as well. The campaign, based at defectivebydesign.org, organizes anti-DRM activists for in-person and online actions, and challenges powerful media and technology interests promoting DRM. Supporters can donate to the campaign at https://crm.fsf.org/civicrm/contribute/transact?reset=1&id=40.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

Media Contact

Zak Rogoff
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
(202) 489-6887
campaigns@fsf.org

###

Catégories: News

LibrePlanet 2015 brings free software luminaries to MIT

mar, 24/03/2015 - 23:40

Richard Stallman gave the opening keynote

At a ceremony on Saturday, March 21st, Free Software Foundation executive director John Sullivan announced the winners of the FSF's annual Free Software Awards. Two awards were given: the Award for the Advancement of Free Software was presented to Sébastien Jodogne for his work on free software medical imaging, and the Award for Projects of Social Benefit was presented to Reglue, an Austin, TX organization that gives GNU/Linux laptops to families in need.

Software Freedom Conservancy executive director Karen Sandler closed out the conference with a rallying cry to "Stand up for the GNU GPL," in which she discussed a lawsuit recently filed in Germany to defend the GNU General Public License. When she asked the audience who was willing to stand up for copyleft, the entire room rose to its feet.

Karen Sandler gave the closing keynote

Videos of all the conference sessions, along with photographs from the conference, will soon be available on https://media.libreplanet.org, the conference's instance of GNU MediaGoblin, a free software media publishing platform that anyone can run.

LibrePlanet 2015 was produced in partnership by the Free Software Foundation and the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB) at MIT.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Libby Reinish
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Catégories: News

Sébastien Jodogne, Reglue are Free Software Award winners

dim, 22/03/2015 - 01:05

The Award for the Advancement of Free Software is given annually to an individual who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of free software.

This year, it was given to Sébastien Jodogne for his work on free software medical imaging with his project Orthanc.

One of Jodogne's nominators said, "The Orthanc project started in 2011, when Sébastien noticed in his work as a medical imaging engineer that hospitals are very exposed to lock-in problems when dealing with their medical imaging flows....Freely creating electronic gateways between imaging modalities (autorouting), between medical departments, or even between hospitals remains a challenging task. But the amount of medical images that are generated, analyzed, and exchanged by hospitals is dramatically increasing. Medical imaging is indeed the first step to the treatment of more and more illnesses, such as cancers or cardiovascular diseases."

Jodogne said, "Technology and humanism are often opposed. This is especially true in the healthcare sector, where many people fear that technological progress will dehumanize the treatments and will reduce the patients to statistical objects. I am convinced that the continuous rising of free software is a huge opportunity for the patients to regain control of their personal health, as well as for the hospitals to provide more competitive, personalized treatments by improving the interoperability between medical devices. By guaranteeing the freedoms of the users, free software can definitely bring back together computers and human beings."

Jodogne joins a distinguished list of previous winners, including the 2013 winner, Matthew Garrett.

The Award for Projects of Social Benefit is presented to a project or team responsible for applying free software, or the ideas of the free software movement, in a project that intentionally and significantly benefits society in other aspects of life. This award stresses the use of free software in the service of humanity.

This year, the award went to Reglue, which gives GNU/Linux computers to underprivileged children and their families in Austin, TX. According to Reglue, Austin has an estimated 5,000 school-age children who cannot afford a computer or Internet access. Since 2005, Reglue has given over 1,100 computers to these children and their families. Reglue's strategy diverts computers from the waste stream, gives them new life with free software, and puts them in the hands of people who need these machines to advance their education and gain access to the Internet.

One nomination for Reglue read, "Mr. Starks has dedicated his life to distributing free software in many forms, both the digital form...and by building new computers from old parts, giving a new life to old machines by re-purposing them into computers given to extremely needy children and families. They are always loaded with free, GNU/Linux software, from the OS up."

Ken Starks, founder of Reglue, was present at the ceremony to accept the award. While all free 'as in freedom' software is not free of charge, Reglue focuses on finding empowering free software that is also gratis. He said of his work with Reglue, "A child's exposure to technology should never be predicated on the ability to afford it. Few things will eclipse the achievements wrought as a direct result of placing technology into the hands of tomorrow."

Nominations for both awards are submitted by members of the public, then evaluated by an award committee composed of previous winners and FSF founder and president Richard Stallman. This year's award committee was: Hong Feng, Marina Zhurakhinskaya, Yukihiro Matsumoto, Matthew Garrett, Suresh Ramasubramanian, Fernanda Weiden, Jonas Öberg, Wietse Venema, and Vernor Vinge.

More information about both awards, including the full list of previous winners, can be found at https://www.fsf.org/awards.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software—particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants—and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

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